Americanah – Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

As teenagers in a Lagos secondary school, Ifemelu and Obinze fall in love. Their Nigeria is under military dictatorship, and people are leaving the country if they can. Ifemelu—beautiful, self-assured—departs for America to study. She suffers defeats and triumphs, finds and loses relationships and friendships, all the while feeling the weight of something she never thought of back home: race. Obinze—the quiet, thoughtful son of a professor—had hoped to join her, but post-9/11 America will not let him in, and he plunges into a dangerous, undocumented life in London.

Years later, Obinze is a wealthy man in a newly democratic Nigeria, while Ifemelu has achieved success as a writer of an eye-opening blog about race in America. But when Ifemelu returns to Nigeria, and she and Obinze reignite their shared passion—for their homeland and for each other—they will face the toughest decisions of their lives.

Fearless, gripping, at once darkly funny and tender, spanning three continents and numerous lives, Americanah is a richly told story set in today’s globalized world: Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s most powerful and astonishing novel yet.

A Culture of Corruption: Everyday Deception and Popular Discontent in Nigeria

“By all measurements Nigeria, richly endowed with natural and human resources and the United States’ fifth largest source of imported oil, should be one of the most prosperous of the world’s developing countries. Instead it is one of the poorest. No one has done a better job than Daniel Jordan Smith of showing how and why the cancer of corruption has hobbled the giant of Africa. A Culture of Corruption is an absorbing cultural study by an anthropologist who deeply cares about the society into which he has married.”–Walter Carrington, former U.S. Ambassador to Nigeria

“This is a path-breaking study of a challenging topic for African studies, anthropology, development economics, and social sciences in general. If any country in Africa should be able to join the world’s newly industrialized countries, it should be Nigeria in view of its size and its oil wealth. The common explanation of its constant failure to do so is corruption. The great merit of this book is to show that corruption has many faces in everyday life. The term is all too often used as a blanket notion. Smith shows how misleading this is by studying it as a daily reality with manifold expressions. The book fills an urgent need. We must better understand the reasons why Africa’s giant is stagnating if we want to be able to say something about the continent’s present-day crisis.”–Peter Geschiere, University of Amsterdam

“Nigeria is known globally as a center for scams of a variety and audacity that are astounding to those who trust that their own societies and economies run according to ‘the rules.’ In A Culture of Corruption, Daniel Jordan Smith draws on many years of living in Nigeria as an NGO representative and anthropologist to cast a very wide net around Nigerian corruption, to include contemporary official and unofficial malfeasance of all kinds. His exposition is graphic, detailed, and broadly supported. He doesn’t flinch before quite terrifying case material. There is no other work that covers the same ground so clearly and in such a nuanced and observant manner.”–Jane I. Guyer, Johns Hopkins University

Sunnie Ododo – Hard Choice

Ododo’s central theme espouses the existentiality of man. He chooses for himself and sets all machinery in motion to execute his choice of actions. His anxieties for achievements drive him to the extreme and also to damn all consequences, good or bad…

Published in November 2011, this drama is available in Kraft Books, Ibadan, and all bigger bookshops within Nigeria.

Last Train to Biafra – Diliorah Chukwurah

An incident at a hospital ward round in southern England brought back memories of his Biafran childhood to a Nigerian doctor. Biafra was formed in 1967 when the former Eastern region of Nigeria seceded due to political crises that resulted in the massacre of the Igbos and other peoples of the Eastern region, Rwandan style. Biafrans went down in history for their immense suffering, resilience and industry. The author has written about life as a Biafran child including times spent at refugee camps. The author pays tribute to charities and Christian missionaries that helped the Biafran children and their parents.

 

Lagoon by Nnedi Okorafor

When a massive object crashes into the ocean off the coast of Lagos, Nigeria’s most populous and legendary city, three people wandering along Bar Beach (Adaora, the marine biologist- Anthony, the rapper famous throughout Africa- Agu, the troubled soldier) find themselves running a race against time to save the country they love and the world itself… from itself. Lagoon expertly juggles multiple points of view and crisscrossing narratives with prose that is at once propulsive and poetic, combining everything from superhero comics to Nigerian mythology to tie together a story about a city consuming itself.

At its heart a story about humanity at the crossroads between the past, present, and future, Lagoon touches on political and philosophical issues in the rich tradition of the very best science fiction, and ultimately asks us to consider the things that bind us together – and the things that make us human.

‘There was no time to flee. No time to turn. No time to shriek. And there was no pain. It was like being thrown into the stars.’

We Should All Be Feminists

What does “feminism” mean today? That is the question at the heart of We Should All Be Feminists, a personal, eloquently-argued essay—adapted from her much-viewed Tedx talk of the same name—by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, the award-winning author of Americanah and Half of a Yellow Sun. With humor and levity, here Adichie offers readers a unique definition of feminism for the twenty-first century—one rooted in inclusion and awareness. She shines a light not only on blatant discrimination, but also the more insidious, institutional behaviors that marginalize women around the world, in order to help readers of all walks of life better understand the often masked realities of sexual politics. Throughout, she draws extensively on her own experiences—in the U.S., in her native Nigeria, and abroad—offering an artfully nuanced explanation of why the gender divide is harmful for women and men, alike. Argued in the same observant, witty and clever prose that has made Adichie a bestselling novelist, here is one remarkable author’s exploration of what it means to be a woman today—and an of-the-moment rallying cry for why we should all be feminists

Black Skin, White Coats

Black Skin, White Coats is a history of psychiatry in Nigeria from the 1950s to the 1980s. Working in the contexts of decolonization and anticolonial nationalism, Nigerian psychiatrists sought to replace racist colonial psychiatric theories about the psychological inferiority of Africans with a universal and egalitarian model focusing on broad psychological similarities across cultural and racial boundaries. Particular emphasis is placed on Dr. T. Adeoye Lambo, the first indigenous Nigerian to earn a specialty degree in psychiatry in the United Kingdom in 1954. Lambo returned to Nigeria to become the medical superintendent of the newly founded Aro Mental Hospital in Abeokuta, Nigeria’s first “modern” mental hospital. At Aro, Lambo began to revolutionize psychiatric research and clinical practice in Nigeria, working to integrate “modern” western medical theory and technologies with “traditional” cultural understandings of mental illness. Lambo’s research focused on deracializing psychiatric thinking and redefining mental illness in terms of a model of universal human similarities that crossed racial and cultural divides.

It’s the first work to focus primarily on black Africans as producers of psychiatric knowledge and as definers of mental illness in their own right. By examining the ways that Nigerian psychiatrists worked to integrate their psychiatric training with their indigenous backgrounds and cultural and civic nationalisms, Black Skin, White Coats provides a foil to Frantz Fanon’s widely publicized reactionary articulations of the relationship between colonialism and psychiatry. Black Skin, White Coats is also on the cutting edge of histories of psychiatry that are increasingly drawing connections between local and national developments in late-colonial and postcolonial settings and international scientific networks. Heaton argues that Nigerian psychiatrists were intimately aware of the need to engage in international discourses as part and parcel of the transformation of psychiatry at home.

But it here.

Wisdom Anierobi: Path of Madness and Other Stories

Published in July 16th by Oracle Books, this fiction is available to everyone on Amazon.

Here’s a short description of the book:

Anierobi’s robust imagination takes him to the innermost recesses of our world to tell stories that derive from our workday experiences. His language is pacy and his characters range from the swashbuckling archetypes to the ingenious stereotypes, whose manners are a predator on your curiosity, sometimes stretching credulity to an unbelievable limit with twists and turns.

The characters . . . represent different shades of society: the heartbroken couple in search of the fruit of the womb, the daredevil armed robbers on the trail of a daredevil driver, the maverick father, the youthful lover questing for a happy ending, the unemployed grad[uate] whose tottering feet are an inspiration for the cartoon man, the disgruntled workers whose take-home can’t take home anymore, the hopeless youth courting Mammon to cut short the long path to his rainy days…

Path of Madness is a reflection of our contemporary logjams: there is a suffusion of blues in Anierobi’s tales. His concerns [cover] the harrowing experiences an average Nigerian undergoes in a quest for fulfillment…”

— Daily Sun

 

Boko Haram: Inside Nigeria’s Unholy War

An insurgency in Nigeria by the Islamist extremist group Boko Haram has left thousands dead, shaken Africa’s biggest nation and worried the world. Yet they remain a mysterious-almost unknowable-organization. Through extensive on-the-ground reporting, Smith takes readers inside the violence and provides the first in-depth account of the conflict. He traces Boko Haram from its beginnings in Nigeria’s remote northeast to its transformation into a hydra-headed monster, deploying suicide bombers and abducting schoolgirls. Much of the book is told from the perspective of Nigerians who have found themselves caught between the violence of insurgents, brutal security forces and an inept government. It includes the stories of a police officer left paralyzed, women whose husbands have been murdered and a sword-wielding vigilante using charms to fend off insurgent bullets. Smith questions whether there can be any end to the violence and the ways in which this might be achieved. Interspersed with Nigerian history, this book delves into the roots of the unholy war being waged against the backdrop of an evolving extremist threat worldwide.

Book Reveals How Obasanjo Introduced Money Politics In NASS

According to the book written by Dr. Austin Uganwa and slated for public presentation on Monday at Yar’Adua Centre in Abuja, the first time money exchanged hands in the Fourth Republic National Assembly was at inception in 1999 when Obasanjo moved to stop the Senate Presidency bid of Senator Chuba Okadigbo who was adopted by the leadership of the ruling party at that time, the Peoples Democratic Party (PDP) to emerge as the Senate President.

“Obasanjo’s preference was Senator Evan Enwerem who decamped from All Peoples Party (APP) to PDP after winning his election to represent Owerri Senatorial District of Imo State.

“Obasanjo’s penchant for him was on account of his belief that Enwerem would be much easier to control and rail-road than single-minded Okadigbo,” he explains.

The book reveals that even before the inauguration of the Senate in June 3, 1999 large amount of money was moved in to rally Alliance for Democracy (AD), APP Senators and to divide PDP Senators towards actualising Obasanjo’s inclination for Enwerem, adding that it was at this point that the seed of mercantile politics was sown in the National Assembly.

It also drives its point home on page 99 thus: “Obasanjo’s desperation to move against the popular wish of the ruling party at that time unfortunately opened a Pandora box of monumental financial enticement and mercantile politics in the federal legislature”.

The book notes that this was further consolidated during Obasanjo’s unpopular third term project in 2006 which was eventually killed by the lawmakers.

It provides detailed and robust images, account and analyses of first eight years Fourth Republic National Assembly embellished with scholarly media perspectives.